WordPress

Why developers are so divided over WordPress – TNW

Summary

After seeing WordPress top the most dreaded platform on Stack Overflow’s Developer Survey for two years in a row (2019 and 2020), a few weeks ago we explored why developers hate using the CMS.

Interestingly enough, we ended up getting some impassioned responses from developers who love WordPress. Just visit some of the many Quora and Reddit threads about the CMS and you’ll find die-hard WordPress haters and lovers battling it out.

We decided to dig deeper into this story. What’s actually fueling this rift within the developer community and what could WordPress do to appeas…….

After seeing WordPress top the most dreaded platform on Stack Overflow’s Developer Survey for two years in a row (2019 and 2020), a few weeks ago we explored why developers hate using the CMS.

Interestingly enough, we ended up getting some impassioned responses from developers who love WordPress. Just visit some of the many Quora and Reddit threads about the CMS and you’ll find die-hard WordPress haters and lovers battling it out.

We decided to dig deeper into this story. What’s actually fueling this rift within the developer community and what could WordPress do to appease Stack Overflow respondents?

Seeing as we actually use WordPress here at TNW, we started by having a chat with a developer from our very own team.

What WordPress fans love about the CMS: It’s built for everyone

When WordPress started out in 2003, it was built to help bloggers and small businesses develop websites without the need for coding skills. Rather than having to build a site from scratch or hire an expensive agency, these individuals and small teams could simply choose from a number of beautifully designed ‘theme’ templates, customize, and go.

The success of this much simpler and more accessible model held promise for users who wanted to spread their reach. There are now over 4,000 themes to choose from.

Along with that came the first plug-ins so users could customize their site even more with new options to optimize SEO, connect to social, integrate with newsletters, and more. The number of plug-ins ballooned to over 50,000 options.

“From an end user/client perspective, WordPress offers a low learning curve, relative ease of use, and a plugin ecosystem which can enable people and businesses of all skill levels to create high quality sites and applications, often without needing to hire developers,” said Ronan O’Leary, Senior Web Developer at TNW.

Having worked with WordPress over the course of his 10-year career as a web developer, he said:

It’s kind of like having an on again off again relationship.

For him, one of the great things about WordPress is that it’s open source and has an extremely large market share, so there’s a very good chance that a large number of devs have experience in dealing with the platform. This also means that solutions to immediate issues are generally a quick Google away.

“It’s very flexible as it’s grown from being a blog platform to a more rounded, fully featured, and extendable CMS,” O’Leary said.

The problem: It’s become a victim of its own success

The accessibility WordPress was built to offer may just be the cause of the divide we now see within the developer community. With 64 million users across the globe, O’Leary believes:

They’re really the victims of their own success. You can …….

Source: https://thenextweb.com/news/why-developers-divided-over-wordpress